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How Are Judo Throws Different From Judo Sweeps? And How Does BJJ Sweep Differ From It?

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How Are Judo Throws Different From Judo Sweeps? And How Does BJJ Sweep Differ From It?

 

 

Coming from a bjj world the term sweep is typically interpreted as an overturn that happens while one of both opponents are ground fighting.

However coming from judo sweep usually relates to foot sweep.

 

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So how is a judo sweep different from a judo takedown?

In short sweeps are throws but throws aren’t necessarily sweeps. For a sweep to be considered a sweep the center of balance must be swept from under someone. Here we hit some common ground with bjj.

However in this perspective it’s incredibly interesting to look at a bjjscout classic – his analysis of a Rodolfo Vieira go to – seoi nage.

Here scout outlines precisely how thinking of a body in terms of a plane is crucial. This is a thing that’s further mentioned and adapted to the ground in several instructionals by esteemed instructors such as Ryan Hall and Nic Gregoriades. In this sense a throw can be looked at as a disbalancing of an opponent.

 

Interestingly in bjj also sweeps always involve the legs:

Bridge and rolling an opponent might be a useful reversal but it isn’t points according to the ibjjf. Once someone passes your guard and secures a position on you turnover is a reversal not a sweep!

See also: Countering a sweep doesn’t count as a throw.  To get points for a sweep you have to stand up!

Although to be fair, the minds of IBJJF also brought us the art of the double guard pull because due to rules pulling guard vs guard does count as a sweep.

However in judo the difference between a sweep and a throw is a point of contention. As one commenter explains it:
“I’d argue that a sweep isn’t a throw in that the dynamic of a throw rests in setting up and immobilizing the ukes gi. Sweeps rely on setting up the footwork. Just my take.”

 

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