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A More Powerful Way To Pummel From Over Under

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A More Powerful Way To Pummel From Over Under

Photo: Leon Sandoval www.heyleon.comInstagram @heyleonmedia and Facebook.com/heyleonmedia

Guest post by David Avellan, an ADCC bronze medalist. Avellan has defeated many of the world’s best grapplers, such as BJJ Black Belt World Champions Rafael Lovato Jr.Tarsis HumphriesAmaury BittetiAlexandre ‘Xande’ RibeiroRoberto ‘Cyborg’ Abreu, and Rener Gracie.

Avellan is credited for developping The Kimura Trap System , a powerful submission system that counters half guard, turtle guard, and take down players with brutal efficiency.

Pretty much everyone who trains has pummeled before. Usually during warm ups, where it is more of a dance than it is a technique. 🙂

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The likelihood of you using that flowing style of pummeling against a resisting opponent is close to nil – at least from my experience.

Instead, I like to use a more powerful pummel. I actually learned this particular variation from former UFC Champion and MMA legend Tito Ortiz. It involves using your hips to bump your opponent as you jack up your under hook, which is going to put your opponent off balance and create a pocket for your to pummel in with.

Heck, even if you don’t get the double under hooks, you could trap the arm and still be as effective (arguably more if you slam them on that side and they can’t post).

To finish it off, I use the knee reap for the take down. It is low risk, high reward, and minimal effort with a lot of chain sequences to build off of.

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